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How to find the gender of your Twitter followers

If your Twitter account is eligible for advertising, it also has an analytics section that allows you to see the gender of your followers. Just go to https://ads.twitter.com and Analytics > Followers and you will find information about your followers top interests, top locations and gender. Apparently 67% of my followers are male, 33% female.

twitterfollowers

Posted in Twitter.

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Using intentional typos in email marketing is a lame trick

Like most people, I get a lot of unsolicited emails in my inbox. This week I noticed an unusual trick from a conference organizer who was hoping to get noticed, a trick that is one of the least classy I’ve seen in a while. This sender intentionally wrote email invitations that included spelling errors, for which they sent a second email in which they apologized for the embarrasing typo.

The first conference invitation included the word “joint” instead of joined.

webit

The apology came almost immediately after in an email titled “Terrible mistake”.

webit

Notice the “PS”. It’s not a marketing trick. But it is. I got the same made up story last year. The first email then misspelled “shores” with the less appealing “whores”.

webit

The follow up email that time had the title “Sincere apoligies”.

webit

My advice, if you are trying to trick people into reading your emails, at least have the decency to reinvent yourself. That way you run less risk of being exposed as a liar.

Posted in Marketing.

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Twitter suspends Zlatan Ibrahimovic parody account without notice

zlatan twitter account

A parody Twitter account with about 90,000 followers was suspended yesterday without warning. The account @ZIbrahomovic has been entertaining Twitter users for almost two years with funny, but fake, quotes from Swedish football icon Zlatan Ibrahimovic. The account has been up front with the fact that it is not the real Zlatan, but that hasn’t stopped several Swedish news outlets from publishing it as real quotes. SVT, the Swedish public service tv channel, once published a fake quote that said:

“If FIFA does not give me the Ballon d’Or I need to talk to Santa Claus”

And Dagens Nyheter, the largest Swedish daily, once published a quote that read:

“Ronaldo will never play in PSG. They don’t produce as much hairspray in France as he needs.”

Both fake, of course. But now the parody account has been closed down without a warning, which is a bit odd, since there are plenty of other accounts that are allowed to continue as long as they state in the Twitter bio that they are not the person or company they pretend to be.

Funny Twitter chat
The closing down of “fake Zlatan” coincides with a hilarious Twitter Q&A that the real Ibrahimovic (@ibra_official) held yesterday under the Nike campaign hashtag #daretozlatan. Whether there is a connection between the two things remains to be seen. Zlatan’s PR Manager has declined that he has asked Twitter to suspend the account.

Metro in the UK has a list of some of the great chat responses from Ibra. Read them here. If you ask me, they are a little to good to be from Zlatan himself, but then again, I’m a born skeptic…

Posted in PR, Twitter.

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10 things I learned from blogging for 10 years

10 kronor

Today is a very special day, today this blog turns 10 years. I can’t believe I have been blogging for a decade already. Back then in 2004 blogging had not yet become mainstream. This was the first Swedish PR blog and I have this blog to thank for a lot of things. So to celebrate a decade of blogging I decided to list 10 things that I have learned from blogging:

1. Bloggers are generous
It didn’t take more than a few weeks of blogging before I realized that the blogosphere was populated with people who were willing to help you and share knowledge without demanding anything in return. It was a liberating feeling, you had a problem and all you needed to do was ask. I had no idea how I could active the RSS feed but out of nowhere I got the advice that solved the problem.

2. Blogging is fun
I have noticed that I like to express myself through my blog. I also enjoy the hunt for new stories to share and there is never a shortage of topics to blog about. This is my little corner on the web and I can fill it with anything I want. Today that may be something we take for granted, but back in the early days it enabled a lot of people to express their opinions online for the first time, without deep technical knowledge.

3. Blogging takes time
For me, blogging just don’t happen. I don’t write about my daily life or other ”routine” topics. Most posts are the result of research, fact checking and carefully crafted texts. Not that all posts are extremely long, but it takes some work, especially since I write in a second language which sometimes is a chore. It’s a labour of love, but it doesn’t happen if I don’t set some time aside now and then to write a post.

4. Blogging is networking
In 2004, there were more PR blogs in Iran than in Sweden. It was fantastic to be able to network with likeminded people across the world, even in countries where you might think that public relations as a concept barely exists (clearly it did). In fact, you may have more in common with someone on the other side of the planet than with your neighbour. Since I started this blog I have made acquaintances, mainly here in Sweden but also from other countries, that I later have met in person. Having  a blog is a great way to network.

5. Blogging is brand building
Without this blog, I probably would never have had the opportunity to work as a freelance consultant for more than three years and I wouldn’t have my current position as Social Media Manager at  a large Swedish company.

I have been quoted in tens if not hundreds of articles in media such as BBC, CNN, Toronto Star, the Wall Street Journal, Boing Boing and Tech Crunch. I have been on Swedish radio and tv several times as well, all thanks to my blog which have let me position myself as someone who knows a bit about digital PR and social media.

I have also been on the cover of Swedish Internetworld twice (headline: “Hans Kullin knows how to succeed in social media”).

6. Blogging is rewarding
Every time someone shares a post, comments or just simply reads what I write, it is a positive signal that I have created something of interest to another person and that is a positive feeling. Knowing that others can see my blog as a resource is rewarding in itself. My blog has never been one with many comments and nowadays I rarely even get any trackbacks from other blogs. So blogging has changed in that aspect that the reward now comes in form of a tweet or a share/like on Facebook.

7. Blogging is learning
I have learned a lot, not only about blogging, but about the topics I write about. Speaking out publicly forces me to do research, fact check and read conflicting opinions on topics I write about. It is said that you remember a higher percentage of what you write down than what you read or see, so the just the fact that I write stuff down makes me remember more. The blog also becomes a resource that I can go back to because I know I’ve written about something before.

8. Blogging still has a place online
I am active on many social networks such as Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Google+ and so on. Still, there is no other platform that fills the same purpose for me as the blog. This is still in my view the best platform for long form content that includes text, image and/or video. One difference now from the first years is that back then all you needed to do to be read was to get your posts out in the RSS feed. Now, I can have the most brilliant scoop ever and nobody would know about it until I push the post out in my other networks where people can discover it. Nobody finds my blog without Facebook, Twitter, Reddit or other such sites. And Google of course.

9. Blogging is about details
I never liked dealing with html code, plugins or WordPress templates. That’s why I haven’t changed this blog at all in several years. But to get noticed and get your content out to readers you still need to know a miminum of how stuff works online, like how to install plugins, how to tag content, how SEO works and so on. You can do a lot without any coding knowledge but to get real effects it helps to be a geek ;)

10. Blogging is not dead
Even if I don’t blog as frequently as I used to, I still like to try out new things. It is quite fascinating that after 10 years, the most read post ever was actually the post I wrote just before this one. I tried to apply a bit of the Upworthy formula to a post in
order to see if I could make it at least go slightly viral. And it did. The post about how Sweden is unique was shared or liked more than 5,000 times on Facebook and sent tens of thousands of visitors my way. Blogging is still alive and kicking and will continue to be for a long time. It just needs some new ideas now and then.

Thank you all for being a part of my network all this time.

 

 

Posted in Blogging.

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25 maps that show how Sweden is unique

Sweden is a neutral country, a fact that has helped keep us out of war for 200 years. We like to think of ourselves as quite moderate people. We even have our own unique word, “lagom“, which means not too much and not too little, rather “just enough”. But we might not be just as average as we would like to think. In many aspects, Sweden is the most progressive and extreme country in the world.

Here are 25 maps that show Sweden being ranked number one or in the very top on various facts. Click on the maps for larger versions.

1. Milk consumption per capita

Milk-Comsumption-per-Capita

Via Foodbeast

2. Global AgeWatch Index 2013

globalAgeWatch

Via GlobalAgeWatch

3. Equal distribution of income – Gini coefficient

gini map large

Via the Atlantic

4. Gender Inequality Index

Gender_Gap2_thumb

Via the Atlantic Cities

5. Social Progress Index

social-progress-index3

Via SPI

6. Number of researchers per million inhabitants

number_of_researchers_per_million_inhabitants_by_country

Source

7. Coffee consumption per capita

coffee_consumption-3

Source

8. Failed States Index 2013

fsi_basicheatmap_2013_wide

Source

9. BCG Global Innovation Index 2013

800px-Global_Innovation_Index.svg

Sweden ranked #2. Via Wikipedia

10. One of only 22 countries Britain has not invaded

the-only-countries-britain-has-not-invaded

Via the Telegraph

11. Average age at first sex

average_age_at_first_sex_by_country-1

Source

12. Heavy metal bands per 100,000 inhabitants

131112_bi_heavymetal

Via Slate.com

13. Percentage of 15-year-olds who discuss political or social issues with their parents several times per week (Sweden among lowest)

Print

Source

14. Least religious countries

800px-Irreligion_map

Source

15. Government information transparency

OBI-map-rework-forBlog

Via Washington Post

16. Global Competitiveness Index

Global_Competitiveness_Index

Source

17. Forest area in percent of land area

wb_forestarea

Via World Bank

18. Corruption index

Corruption_around_the_World

Source

19. Percentage of Women in National Parliaments

Percentage_of_Women_in_National_Parliaments

Source

20. World Press Freedom Index

World_Press_Freedom_Index

Source

21. The best countries to be a mother

The_Best_and_Worst_Countries_to_Be_a_Mother

Source

22. Map of world happiness

happiness-map

Source

23. Global Cleantech Index

MAP-OF-OVERALL-GLOBAL-CLEANTECH-INNOVATION-INDEX-SCORES-CLEANTECH-GROUP-ANALYSIS

Source

24. Research and development expenditure as percent of GDP

wb_rnd

Via World Bank

25. Fixed broadband internet subscribers per 100 people

wb_broadband

Via World Bank

And finally a bonus chart. The result of the World Values Survey shows that Sweden is quite alone in the upper right hand corner. The graph below ranks countries on factors such as self expression values vs survival values and secular-rational values vs traditional values.

wvs-culture-map

Via World Values Survey

 

Footnote: Inspired by 40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World. This is a translated version of my post that was first published in Swedish on my blog “Sociala Medier“.

Posted in Statistics.

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World class response by Sainsbury’s on Twitter

This conversation on Twitter by Sainsbury’s and a customer may be one of the funniest and best Twitter responses by a brand in a long time.

Fishy Sainsburys - clever response on Twitter

Hat tip: @eskimon

Posted in Case Studies, Twitter.

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