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Facebook pulls the plug on frictionless sharing

share-computer-key-260 In 2011, frictionless sharing was hailed by some as the future for social networks. Facebook launched a feature in which apps like Spotify and Netflix and news organizations like The Guardian could post a user’s activity to their wall, without asking for permission every time. While some criticized the move, others saw potential:

“And soon, the idea that apps are sharing a continuous stream of our activity will seem just as commonplace and uncontroversial as the original news feed.”

But with increasing comptetion in the newsfeed, the feature hasn’t paid off and now Facebook has effectively pulled the plug on automatically shared content. Stories shared via seamless sharing will still be posted to Facebook, but have been downgraded to second tier content, thereby making it more or less invisible to users.

Facebook says that “We’ve found that stories people choose to explicitly share from third party apps are typically more interesting and get more engagement in News Feed than stories shared from third party apps without explicit action.”

This means that stories that users share automatically from third party apps will receive a lower ranking in the news feed.

“In the coming months, we will continue to prioritize explicitly shared stories from apps in News Feed over implicitly shared stories. This means people will see fewer implicit stories from third party apps in the future.” 

The average Facebook user has around 1,500 stories per day that potentially could appear in the news feed. Content shared via frictionless sharing isn’t engaging enough and now Facebook is acting to remove a lot of that content, possibly pushing more engaging stories to users.

Via Inside Facebook.

Posted in Marketing.

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Hundreds of photos from the Eurovision Song Contest made available for free on Wikipedia

ESC2014_-_Austria_02_conchita_wurst

The Eurovision Song Contest is one of the largest international TV events with an estimated 125 million viewers annually in 56 countries. In spite of this, there are very few photos from the contest available for free use on for example Wikipedia.

To show the Wikipedia community that it was possible to cover a major event and share quality images for common use, Swedish photographer Albin Olsson took advantage of the fact that last year’s final took place in his home country Sweden. He uploaded 870 images and videos from the Eurovision Song Contest 2013 with a Creative Commons license to Wikimedia.

This year as the Eurovision was hosted in Copenhagen, Denmark, Olsson continued and extended his project. He spent two weeks prior to the event covering press conferences and rehearsals. There are now more than 900 photos and video files uploaded to Wikimedia by Olsson, free for usage under a CC-BY-SA-3.0 license.

Find all photos taken by Albin Olsson during the Eurovision Song Contest 2014 here.

Footnote: Image of winner Conchita Wurst above by Albin Olsson (Own work) CC-BY-SA-3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Via @ernstpoulsen

Posted in Media & Journalism.

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Follow the Eurovision on social media

The first of two semi finals of the Eurovision Song Contest takes place tonight in Copenhagen, Denmark. New this year is the ambition to bring the participants closer to the audience via social media.

The Social Green Room
Social media has become increasingly important as the place to read and share opinions about the contest. So to make it even easier to find live reporting from the participating countries, the Danish public service television channel DR has created a Social Green Room that collects updates from the artists official Twitter, Instagram and Facebook accounts. You can either follow a stream of updates or select updates from one country.

Official Eurovision social media channels:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EurovisionSongContest

Instagram: http://instagram.com/eurovision

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Eurovision and https://twitter.com/eurovisionpress

Twitter hashtags: #eurovision #esc2014

eurovision-ticktock

Like in recent years, some artists are promoting hashtags of their own, like the Ukraine’s #ticktock. You can also use the country code for each country as a hashtag, like #SWE for Sweden and #DEN for Denmark. A list of country codes can be found here.

Posted in Twitter.

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How to find the gender of your Twitter followers

If your Twitter account is eligible for advertising, it also has an analytics section that allows you to see the gender of your followers. Just go to https://ads.twitter.com and Analytics > Followers and you will find information about your followers top interests, top locations and gender. Apparently 67% of my followers are male, 33% female.

twitterfollowers

Posted in Twitter.

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Using intentional typos in email marketing is a lame trick

Like most people, I get a lot of unsolicited emails in my inbox. This week I noticed an unusual trick from a conference organizer who was hoping to get noticed, a trick that is one of the least classy I’ve seen in a while. This sender intentionally wrote email invitations that included spelling errors, for which they sent a second email in which they apologized for the embarrasing typo.

The first conference invitation included the word “joint” instead of joined.

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The apology came almost immediately after in an email titled “Terrible mistake”.

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Notice the “PS”. It’s not a marketing trick. But it is. I got the same made up story last year. The first email then misspelled “shores” with the less appealing “whores”.

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The follow up email that time had the title “Sincere apoligies”.

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My advice, if you are trying to trick people into reading your emails, at least have the decency to reinvent yourself. That way you run less risk of being exposed as a liar.

Posted in Marketing.

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Twitter suspends Zlatan Ibrahimovic parody account without notice

zlatan twitter account

A parody Twitter account with about 90,000 followers was suspended yesterday without warning. The account @ZIbrahomovic has been entertaining Twitter users for almost two years with funny, but fake, quotes from Swedish football icon Zlatan Ibrahimovic. The account has been up front with the fact that it is not the real Zlatan, but that hasn’t stopped several Swedish news outlets from publishing it as real quotes. SVT, the Swedish public service tv channel, once published a fake quote that said:

“If FIFA does not give me the Ballon d’Or I need to talk to Santa Claus”

And Dagens Nyheter, the largest Swedish daily, once published a quote that read:

“Ronaldo will never play in PSG. They don’t produce as much hairspray in France as he needs.”

Both fake, of course. But now the parody account has been closed down without a warning, which is a bit odd, since there are plenty of other accounts that are allowed to continue as long as they state in the Twitter bio that they are not the person or company they pretend to be.

Funny Twitter chat
The closing down of “fake Zlatan” coincides with a hilarious Twitter Q&A that the real Ibrahimovic (@ibra_official) held yesterday under the Nike campaign hashtag #daretozlatan. Whether there is a connection between the two things remains to be seen. Zlatan’s PR Manager has declined that he has asked Twitter to suspend the account.

Metro in the UK has a list of some of the great chat responses from Ibra. Read them here. If you ask me, they are a little to good to be from Zlatan himself, but then again, I’m a born skeptic…

Posted in PR, Twitter.

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