Edelman Trust Barometer 2012 says trust in social media is up

The latest installement of the Edelman Trust Barometer has now been published and as usual, it is interesting reading. This year, there have been some dramatic changes in the views of the public in most of the countries surveyed. Trust in government, business and NGO’s is declining while trust in media is rising.

Trust in government shows an exceptionally sharp drop in the 2012 Barometer, after rising steadily for four years. In Sweden (“informed public”), trust in government is quite stable, dropping only from 64% to 62%, making Sweden the market with the fourth highest level of trust in government. Trust in business is also decreasing, although in Sweden it is acutally up from 52% to 54%, possibly thanks to the relatively stable Swedish economy compared to many other countries.

If we look at different media sources, it is interesting to see the dramatic increase in trust in social media, now almost at the same level as corporate information. Note: responses are for “informed public”, i.e. college educated, high income, high media consumption.

edelman-trust-barometer-2012

Overall, there is a huge drop in trust for CEO’s while trust in pers such as regular employees and “a person like yourself” is increasing dramatically.

edelman-trust-2012-peers

In other words, there is less trust in messages communicated by CEO’s through traditional corporate channels and increased trust in messages from our peers, communicated through for example social media channels. There’s a lot more to read and you’ll find the whole presentation here below.


Tweeting police in China and other social media news

Social media accounts of woman suing hospital to stay private
St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver and some of its doctors got sued by a patient who claims that she suffered a stroke due to malpractice during an operation. The stroke caused cognitive impairment of her thinking process and has negatively affected her social life, she claims. The defendant doctors applied to gain access to her Facebook and Twitter accounts, as well as her laptop computer, iPhone and digital camera in order to probe her online and digital social life.

But in a ruling released on Tuesday, B.C. Supreme Court Master Grant Taylor dismissed the defendants’ application, saying the defendants should not be given “carte blanche to troll through the plaintiff’s correspondence.”

Delhi threatens crackdown on social media
Free speech is under pressure as India has threatened to take action against sites like Facebook, Google and Twitter, if they refuse to remove blasphemous and politically inflammatory material from their sites. Kapil Sibal, India’s telecommunications minister, has suggested that online content should be  pre-screened and that social media sites need to find mechanisms to monitor and block the release of “offensive material”.

The controversial suggestion sparked a frenzy of online comments, with the hashtag #IdiotKapilSibal becoming a trending topic in India on Tuesday. Read more here and here.

#IdiotKapilSibal

China’s tweeting cops blog to keep peace
Micro blogging is catching on fast in China. The local Twitter-like networks Sina Weibo and Tencent Weibo now have some 250m and 300m registered users, respectively.

Sina Weibo has launched a government edition and, so far, close to 19,000 officials and government departments have started tweeting, according to a report published last month. With more than 5,000 accounts, the police have been the most enthusiastic adopters. The tweeting Beijing police found that even in China, broadcasting on micro blogs doesn’t work very well:

“In the beginning, we put our press releases out there in bits and pieces, but people found it was too official,” says Mr Yang. “We had to learn to come up with things closer to their lives.”

More than half of Swedes and Danes use social media for travel

Smartphones and tablet computers are transforming the traveller experience. A new report – The always-connected traveller: How mobile will transform the future of air travel”by Amadeus, explains how the way travellers interact with the airline industry, as well as travel and tourism in general, is about to change.

One hardly surprising finding from the study is that social media is having a major impact on all parts of the travel life cycle. A majority of the respondents in a survey commissioned by Amadeus use social media for travel related purposes. In Sweden and Denmark, 53% of respondents report that they use social media related travel sites. Depending on how that question was asked, I wouldn’t be surprised to see that the overall use of social media during travel is much higher. Other surveys show that as many as 48% of Swedes use Facebook during vacation.

Click image to enlarge.

social media use for travel purposes - chart

Read the entire report below.

Amadeus -The Always Connected Traveller 2011

40% use social media while watching tv

Social media adds another dimension to watching tv. According to a new study, “TV & Video Consumer Trend Report 2011” from Ericsson ConsumerLab, more than 40% of consumers use social media while they are watching tv, on a weekly basis.

social media chart

Anders Erlandsson, Senior Advisor at Ericsson ConsumerLab, says:

“Our in-depth interviews – especially those in the us, which is a frontrunner in TV/video consumer trends – show how social media usage is impacting viewing. The majority of families combined TV viewing with the use of Twitter, facebook, texting, voice calls and forum discussions about what they watched. This is particularly the case when watching reality shows and sports. This communication adds another dimension to the TV experience, as consumers found an annoying reality show funnier when they were able to comment on social media about ‘terrible singers’, ugly clothing or when your favorite team scores a goal. It is safe to say that this behavior is increasing. It is time to welcome the ‘virtual TV sofa’.”

Data was collected in Australia, Austria, Brazil, China, Germany, the Netherlands, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, the UK, the US and South Korea.

Full report in pdf here.

Social media used to identify rioters in Vancouver

Maybe I’m old fashioned, but if I was considering doing something illegal, I’d probably not choose a situation where there were thousands of cameras around. Then again, I’ve never been in a riot. As you’ve probably already heard, there were riots in Vancouver this week after the city’s hockey team Vancouver Canucks lost the Stanley Cup title to the Boston Bruins. All over the town, people were taking photos and videos of rioters looting and smashing cars. With a quick search for “Vancouver riots” we can find more than 1,000 videos on YouTube and close to 4,000 photos on Flickr from last week.

Conclusion: social media is a gold mine for those who wish to identify the rioters. And those are for example the Vancouver Police Departement and citizens that want to name and shame to looters. On Facebook, there are several groups and pages with titles like “Vancouver 2011 Rioters Public Humiliation Page” and “Help vancouver: post pics and video of rioters and looters”. Some of them claim to have identified individuals in the photos and reveal it in photos like the one below.

Vancouver riots

While taking the law into your own hands is not at all recommended, there are other ways to help. VPD, the Vancouver Police Departement uses social media to encourage citizens to help identify suspects in the riots. On the VPD Facebook page, the police have posted instructions for how to submit YouTube videos to VPD. And apparently the response from the public has been very positive:

“The response from the public wanting to help the police identify the individuals involved in criminal activity that occurred after Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Finals on the night of June 15, 2011 has been tremendous”, VPD says in a statement.

VPD is also actively using Flickr and YouTube to communicate, and the VPD Twitter account is used to help solve crime.

Finally, I love this photo that was posted on the VPD Facebook page. The VPD had parked a car in Greenville, to help with the clean up effort. When the policemen returned, the car was covered in post it notes with thank you messages. More photos here.

vpd police car

Flickr Photo by BrittneyBush.

 

Manchester United vs FC Barcelona – the Social Media Champions League

Manchester United TwitterManchester United’s manager Sir Alex Ferguson recently hinted that his players may be banned from using Twitter. Tonight his club will face FC Barcelona in the UEFA Champions League final on Wembley in London. This game between two of the world’s most popular football teams is predicted to be one of the best finals in a long time. Discussions and opinions about the game will be all over social media and it will probably dominate the trending topics on Twitter today.

In spite of Ferguson’s hesitancy towards Twitter, both clubs have managed to gather quite a large following in social media. The question is, how does Man Utd stand in comparison to FC Barcelona, in terms of presence in social media?

Facebook – close win for Barcelona
Both teams are very active and a typical status update can draw as many as 30,000 likes and 3,000 comments. Man Utd has 14,418,000 fans on Facebook, Barcelona has 15,311,000 fans. United is also growing its fanbase slightly faster during the last month.

Man Utd FC Barcelona Facebook pages

Twitter – a clear win for Barcelona
The teams are also active on Twitter. Man Utd has 282,900 followers,  FC Barcelona has two major Twitter accounts, one in Spanish with 826,200 followers and one in English with 719,200 followers. The Spanish Barca account has been growing more rapidly than the Man Utd account.

Man Utd FC Barcelona Twitter followers

YouTube – Barcelona wins on walk over
FC Barcelona Twitter Manchester United publish videos on MUTV, on its own web page and from what I can find, the club is not active on YouTube. Barcelona on the other hand, has an active YouTube channel with 82,600 subscribers and a total of 42.2 million views. But Man Utd frequently posts videos on Facebook, so the English team has merely chosen a slightly different strategy.

Conclusion: both teams have millions of fans that follow them via social media, but FC Barcelona is slightly more popular. This has probably no impact on tonight’s Champions League final, but be sure that fans will actively cheer for their teams tonight and celebrate (or mourn) the outcome. May the best team win!

Footnote: stats from Wildfire App.